18/01/04

Sometimes trying your best isn’t enough; when the situation demands it, you need to be perfect. For Jon Bowers, who runs a training facility for professional delivery drivers, the stakes are high — 100 people in the US die every day in car accidents — and it’s perfection, or “a willingness to do what is difficult to achieve what is right,” that he looks to achieve. He explains why we should all be equally diligent about striving toward perfection in everything we do, even if it means failing along the way.

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Introduction

  • What is a typo?

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Watch

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Think about it

Answer the questions below.

  • What is typosquatting?
  • What kind of “typo” happened at Amazon and what did it lead to?
  • Where does Jon seek perfection?
  • How does Jon define perfectionism?
  • How does Jon prove that 99% of accuracy is not enough?
  • What is Jon’s attitude to failure?
  • What is the true illness in American society according to Jon?
  • Do you agree with Jon’s ideas? Why? Why not?

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Practice makes perfect

Fill in the blank spaces with the missing words. Use ONE word per blank space.

Look, a hundred people die every day ________ to vehicular crashes. Think about that ________ a second.That’s like the equivalent ________ four commercial airliners crashing every week, yet we still can’t convince ourselves to pay perfect attention behind the wheel. So I teach my drivers to value perfection. It’s why I have ________ memorize our 131-word defensive driving program perfectly, and then I have them rewrite it. One wrong word, one misspelled word, one missing comma, it’s ________ failed test. It’s why I do uniform inspections daily. Undershirts are white or brown only, shoes are black or brown polished leather and frankly, don’t come to my class wrinkled and expect me to ________ you stay. It’s why I insist that my drivers ________ on time. Don’t be late, not to class, not to break, not to lunch. When you’re supposed to be somewhere, be there.

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