22/07/06

Surveillance-tracking methods can alienate workers. When it comes to staying on task in remote landscapes, a human touch is important.

 

 

 

Read

https://www.inc.com/rebecca-deczynski/employee-monitoring-work-asynchronous-remote-hybrid-workplace.html

Glossary

  • contentious – controversial
  • to ascribe – to consider something to be caused, created, or owned by someone or something
  • laissez-faire – the idea that people should be free to choose how to do things, without too much control from someone in authority
  • conducive – providing the right conditions for something good to happen or exist
  • parallel – used to describe an event or situation that happens at the same time as and/or is similar to another one

True or False?

 

1.     Unless an employee feels his/her work is monitored constantly, it’s easier to keep them in one workplace.

2.     The theory saying that one finds motivation within oneself to do his/her job the best he/she can is more associated with blue-collar workers.

3.     A company can do without regular conversations having AllVoices platform.

4.     If one feels down on a given day, it justifies his/her curtness in emails to his/her employees/co-workers.

 

Key: 1.T; 2F; 3F; 4F

 

Practice Makes Perfect

Use the words/phases below to replace the words/phrases in bold in the article:

 

pop up            taking a toll                       well-versed    ample

insightful        thrust             inordinate      ramping up

 

Productivity Tracking: The Do’s And Don’ts For Successful Implementation

(…) it is reasonable to understand why employers are 1. increasing sharply their spending on productivity tracking. In one case, a software company specializing in employee productivity monitoring has seen inbound interest increase by 600%. After all, the average office employee typically spends about five hours per week on his or her cellphone on things that have nothing to do with their job. Combine that with a workforce being 2. sent into an unfamiliar remote environment, and you’ve got the recipe for a potential productivity spiral.

But implementing this kind of initiative in the workplace is like most others; it won’t work without a plan. (…) I’ve learned that when introducing a productivity initiative to your business, there are some do’s and don’ts to keep in mind:

Do determine what metrics you want to track. You can get granular with the data, but it’s best to track actionable activity that you can digest to start with. (…) Do your homework before setting your plan into action, and the data rewards will be far more 3. perceptive.

Do look out for red flags. Your employees are human beings. (…)If you find that your managers must continually drag an employee along in their work, it is undoubtedly 4. having a bad effect on the rest of the team and your company. At this point, it is time to act.

Do have a plan to leverage the data.(…) Having data often helps drive this point home and makes it easier for the employee to see the bigger picture and take action to correct their behavior. If the inactivity and lack of engagement continue, you’ll have 5. sufficient justification to take disciplinary action.(…)

Don’t micromanage or invade personal privacy: Your employees are going to have issues 6. happen unexpectedly during work hours. You shouldn’t expect them to neglect important personal issues simply because it requires them to take a few minutes away from work. If you notice a persistent problem with an employee taking an 7. excessive amount of time to conduct personal business, it might be time to address it. (…)

There is no one-size-fits-all solution for productivity monitoring. It should never serve as your sole purpose of measuring success. You’re safe to turn away any company trying to sell you a software solution as a cure-all. When you ultimately decide on a solution, make sure the provider is 8. very knowledgeable on the laws and best practices of monitoring employee productivity.

In order to read the whole article, go to: http://HTTPS://WWW.FORBES.COM/SITES/FORBESBUSINESSCOUNCIL/2020/07/27/PRODUCTIVITY-TRACKING-THE-DOS-AND-DONTS-FOR-SUCCESSFUL-IMPLEMENTATION

 

Key: 1. ramping up; 2. thrust; 3. insightful; 4. taking a toll; 5. ample; 6. pop up; 7. inordinate; 8. well-versed

 

Use the words in bold from the exercise above to fill in the gaps in the sentences below:

 

1. He is a ……….. scholar on the subject of biblical literature.

2. The deepening recession has also taken its …….. in the south of the country, where unemployment is high.

3. I should have known something like this would ………… .

4. The manager gave me ………… time to respond.

5. This is the most ………….. study on the problem up to now.

 

 

Key: 1. well-versed; 2. toll; 3. pop up; 4. ample; 5. insightful

 

Explore it more to create your own teaching-learning experience!

 

Modern work — from waiting tables to crunching numbers to designing products — is about solving brand-new problems every day, flexibly and collaboratively. But as Yves Morieux shows in this insightful talk, too often, an overload of rules, processes and metrics keeps us from doing our best work together. Meet the new frontier of productivity: cooperation.

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